Language Requirements

All students are welcome to study languages as their curricula permit. Students pursuing majors in some of the Colleges and Schools are required to take language courses. Language courses are not required by the Core Curriculum, but some advanced language courses can satisfy either the Liberal Arts 4 or Liberal Arts 6 requirement of the Core.

Language placement is explained here.

The following languages are taught at Notre Dame. If you are interested in studying a language with an asterisk, contact your first-year advisor. You may also be interested in learning about some Less Commonly Taught Languages here.

  • Arabic
  • Chinese (Mandarin)
  • Creole (Haitian)*
  • French
  • German
  • Greek (Ancient)
  • Hebrew*
  • Hindi*
  • Irish
  • Italian
  • Japanese
  • Korean
  • Latin
  • Portuguese
  • Quechua*
  • Russian
  • Spanish
  • Swahili*

 

School of Architecture

Students in Architecture must complete the equivalent of two semesters of Italian by the end of sophomore year to prepare for junior year in Rome. Students can satisfy this requirement by taking Beginning Italian (ROIT 10110), an intensive six-credit course, or by taking ROIT 10101 (Beginning Italian I) and ROIT 10102 (Beginning Italian II). The Italian requirement is normally completed during sophomore year, but students with AP or IB credit for calculus, physics, or Writing and Rhetoric can begin studying Italian during their first year.

 

College of Arts and Letters

Students in Arts and Letters must reach intermediate proficiency and take at least one language course at the intermediate or advanced level in one of the modern or classical languages taught at Notre Dame. Intermediate proficiency is defined as completing the fourth semester of a language. Students beginning a new language will take four courses. Students continuing a language previously studied will take one to four courses, depending on their placement. Students who place beyond the fourth semester will take at least one course at the appropriate level. Students studying French, German, Italian, and Spanish have the option to take six-credit intensive courses that allow them to advance in the language more quickly and satisfy the requirement with fewer courses.

Students whose primary language is not English, or who have been educated in a language other than English, may request an exemption from the foreign language requirement from the College.


Mendoza College of Business

The Mendoza College of Business does not have a language requirement.

 

College of Engineering

The College of Engineering does not have a language requirement.

 

Keough School of Global Affairs

Students pursuing the supplementary major in Global Affairs in Keough must meet the same requirement as students in the College of Arts and Letters (see above). The Keough requirement must be satisfied with a modern language and cannot be satisfied with a classical language (Latin or Greek).

 

College of Science

Students in Science must demonstrate intermediate proficiency in one of the modern or classical languages taught at Notre Dame. Intermediate proficiency is demonstrated in one of the following ways: courses taken at Notre Dame; AP, IB, or SAT II credit; or a placement exam offered by Notre Dame. For modern and classical European languages, intermediate proficiency is defined as completing the third semester or placing into the fourth semester or higher. For Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, and Korean, intermediate proficiency is defined as completing the second semester of the intensive first-year sequence or placing into the second-year sequence or higher. Students beginning a new language will take two or three courses, depending on the language and the courses selected. Students satisfying the requirement with a language previously studied will take zero to three courses, depending on placement. Students studying French, German, Italian, and Spanish have the option to take six-credit intensive courses that allow them to advance in the language more quickly and satisfy the requirement with fewer courses.