University of Notre Dame

Program Requirements

This page was last updated on June 22, 2016, and is subject to change.

Students contemplating a major in architecture, art, art history, design, engineering, music, or science are advised to take courses in these areas to confirm their intentions and enable them to advance most efficiently into their college programs. The specific courses required for these college programs are:

ARCH: ARCH 11011
AL-ARHI: ARHI 20540 or ARHI 20560
AL-ARST and AL-DESN: ARST 11100, ARST 11201, ARST 11601, ARST 21101, ARST 21301, ARST 21401, ARST 21501, DESN 20101, DESN 21200
AL-BFA: ARHI 20440, ARST 11100, ARST 11201, ARST 11601, ARST 21101, ARST 21301, ARST 21401, ARST 21501, DESN 20101, DESN 21200
AL–MUS: MUS 20001 and 20011
BA: ECON 10010/10011*
EG: EG 10111
EG–AL: EG 10111
SC-ACMS: PHYS 10310
SC–BCHM: BIOS 10161
SC–BIOS: BIOS 10161
SC–CHEM: PHYS 10310
SC-ES: BIOS 10161
SC–MATH: PHYS 10310
SC-NSBH: BIOS 10161
SC–PHYS: PHYS 10411
SC-STATS: PHYS 10310

  • ECON 10010/10011 is not required first semester. Please also list two additional options on your Course Selection Form.

ARCH 11011: Graphics 1—Drawing

Open to all students. Required for those entering the Architecture program.

The class offers instruction and practice in drawing as a means of exploring and communicating formal and theoretical concepts. Aspects of freehand drawing in pencil, charcoal, and watercolor are taught with subjects from buildings and nature.

EG 10111 and 10112: Introduction to Engineering Systems I and II

Required for Engineering intents.
Corequisite: MATH 10550 or 10850.

The introductory engineering course sequence at the University of Notre Dame offers all students considering engineering an opportunity to explore the multi-disciplinary nature of engineering through hands-on design projects. The projects are team based and are constantly evolving but maintain focus on a variety of learning objectives relating to: modeling, analysis, computer programming, design, and technical communication. Past projects have included: scanner decoders, data storage systems, neutralizing waste systems, creating computer games, and launching projectiles, bridge project, pet robot, and open ended design.

The structure of the course sequence is based on both theory and practice. In each 75-minute class period, a short lecture is immediately put into practice through an active learning experience.

In the first semester, students will work on projects defined by the course instructors, while in the second semester, students will work in teams on projects of their own design. Throughout both semesters, students will learn how to identify, formulate and solve problems; how to verify and communicate results; and how to use computers to aid in the problem-solving process.